2017 Lisgar Independent Tournament results

Able to declare winners better than the Oscars

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Lisgar’s annual Reach-style tournament was held last weekend, with 13 teams in attendance across two divisions. Teams from the University of Toronto Schools won both. Lisgar, Kennebecasis Valley, and Glebe rounded out the top 4 in the upper bracket. Congratulations to all the teams.

I have uploaded results here. I noticed a nice bit of elegance in that all the teams finished in order of R-value; in other words, their performance in practice (wins) lined up with their theoretical performance (answering questions).

Speaking of R-value, most teams saw a drop compared to last year. While some of the upper division teams are weaker than last year (including Lisgar “A” missing their top players due to authorship), the change looks like it can be attributed to the improved performance of the less experienced division. The record R-values of last year probably came from strong teams playing other strong teams on a set that had its average PPG deflated by poor point totals in the lower division. A stronger lower division this year meant it was more difficult for top teams to “stand out”. Overall though, it does look like year-to-year R-value comparisons need to be taken with a grain of salt. NAQT’s D-value, which the R-value is derived from, does not compare year-to-year; it is only relevant for comparing teams playing on the same set (making R-value most applicable for Reach Regionals).

The quality of the question set was up and down. Based on the final results, it was clearly able to sort teams properly and not produce weird upsets. Assigned questions were balanced. Relays were balanced and parts increased in difficulty evenly. Most “what-am-I”s became easier with each passing clue. The absence of shootouts, “wordplay” questions and solving math on paper is a great personal preference. On the negative side, there were still problems associated with old SchoolReach that even modern Reach is trying to get rid of. Some questions tricked where the answer was heading – a question should never use “but” to change the course partway through. “Who-am-I”s still frequently open with biographical information about birth and education – very few people are important to know about because of the date of their birth, unless they are Jesus or from Midnight’s Children. Finally, there were too many questions about movie directors (and I like movies!) – the set needed to be guided by an overall subject distribution. All this being said, I’m aware that writing a tournament requires a lot of work (I’ve done it) and I don’t want to come across as too tough on high school students. Their work is as good as, if not better than, current SchoolReach sets.

I was able to record the matches I read. I have transferred over the raw audio to start working on it, and will probably limit the editing to removing personal information (if any) and dead air. No intros! Stay tuned here for updates.

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